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RVing Offers the Best Vacation Value

Road in RV parkSince the 1980s, PKF Consulting, an international travel and tourism research firm, has conducted seven complete vacation cost analyses comparing the cost of various typical family RV trips with other types of vacations. Every study, including the most recent in 2008 when fuel prices were at a cyclic high, found that a typical family RV vacation costs less than a vacation with travel by personal car or airline coupled with hotels and rental cars, or taking a cruise or renting a condo.

Among the RV vacations, even those taken in an ultra-luxury Type A diesel motorhome were less expensive than flying and staying in a hotel for all but one trip analyzed. Only a family taking a vacation by personal car with hotel or renting a condo and cooking for themselves would spend less than a family taking a trip in a high-end motorhome. Type A owners say the added space, comfort and convenience while traveling justify the added investment in the luxury model.

December 19, 2017 / by / in
Learn About the Different Types of RVs

Original Content from Go RVing. Used with permission.

TOWABLE RVS

Towable RVs mount on or are towed by another vehicle to be moved from place to place. Designed to be more lightweight than ever, even family sedans can tow RVs.

Towable RVs must be mounted on or towed by a motorized vehicle to be moved from place to place. Some towables are small and light enough to be towed by the family car, while others require an SUV or pickup truck. Always verify your vehicle’s towing capability and allow for the added weight of personal belongings loaded on board.

Conventional Travel Trailer

Conventional Travel Trailers offer a wide range of floor plans, sizes and conveniences.

Features

  • Smaller models can be towed by mid-size vehicles, including the family car, minivan, SUV or pickup truck equipped with a hitch. It is important to match the loaded weight of the RV to the towing capacity of the tow vehicle. Consult your dealer or owner’s manual for details and have the tow hitch professionally installed.
  • Lightweight composite models are designed specifically for towing behind many six-cylinder family vehicles.
  • At the campground, easily detach from the tow vehicle to use the vehicle for errands and sightseeing.
  • Travel Trailers boast all the conveniences of home, including kitchen, dining, bathroom, entertainment and storage.
  • Slideouts in some models move the RV wall outward up to three feet at the touch of a button, to create larger living areas once the travel trailer is set up in a campsite.

Fifth-Wheel Travel Trailer

The Fifth-Wheel Travel Trailer can have the same amenities as the Conventional Travel Trailer, but is constructed with a raised forward section that provides a spacious bi-level floor plan. These models are designed to be towed by a pickup truck equipped with a device known as a fifth-wheel hitch.

Features

  • Equipped with all the conveniences of home, including sleeping, showering, dining, cooking, entertainment and storage, many manufacturers also offer luxury models that are very spacious and elegantly furnished.
  • There can be as many as four slideouts in some models, which move the RV wall outward up to three feet at the touch of a button to create larger living areas.
  • Fifth-wheels often have a large picture window at the rear for panoramic views.
  • At the campground, easily detach from the tow vehicle, freeing the vehicle for errands and sightseeing.
  • Lightweight models have been designed specifically to allow the use of smaller trucks with less towing capacity.
  • It is important to match the loaded weight of the RV to the towing capacity of the tow vehicle. Consult your dealer or owner’s manual for details and have the tow hitch professionally installed.

*In several states, additional non-commercial driver’s licensing may be required for fifth-wheel travel trailers that exceed certain weight thresholds. Check with your local department of motor vehicles for specifics.

Expandable Travel Trailer

A cross between a hard-sided Travel Trailer and a Folding Camping Trailer, the Expandable Travel Trailer ends pull out to offer more sleeping room. Expandable units are lighter than the Conventional Travel Trailer and often more affordable.

Features

  • Smaller models can be towed by mid-size vehicles: either the family car, minivan, SUV or pickup truck. Check with your dealer for your vehicle’s tow limits.
  • Lightweight versions have been designed specifically for towing behind many six-cylinder family vehicles. It is important to match the loaded weight of the RV to the towing capacity of the tow vehicle. Always check your vehicle’s owner’s manual for towing weight restrictions and have your tow package professionally installed.
  • At the campground, easily detach from the tow vehicle to use the vehicle for errands and sightseeing.
  • A generous amount of living space makes kitchen, dining, bathroom and sleeping areas standard, with additional amenities available depending upon size.

Truck Camper

The Truck Camper is a portable unit designed to be loaded onto, or affixed to, the bed or chassis of a pickup truck. The slide-in units are easily loaded and unloaded from the bed of the truck, freeing the truck’s bumper to tow boats, ATVs and other trailers.

Features

  • Pickup truck owners find Truck Campers to be an easy, economical option for camping getaways.
  • The compact size makes them easy for travel on rough or windy roads.
  • Outdoor sportsmen find them handy for fully equipped base camps in remote locations.
  • The detachable camping unit allows the pickup truck to be used separately at the destination.
  • Small space still offers a range of floor plans that maximize living area. Many models also have slideouts, which move the RV wall outward up to three feet at the touch of a button to create larger living areas.
  • Amenities include toilets, showers, kitchen facilities and storage. 

Sport Utility RV

The Sport Utility RV, or SURV, is for the active family who wants to take motorcycles, dirt bikes, ATVs or other motorized toys on the road. Available as a motorhome or towable unit, the rear end of the SURV drops down, forming a ramp for access into a “garage” area where motorized toys can be safely stored; the living quarters are separated by a wall.

Features

  • All the conveniences of home, including kitchen, dining, bathroom, entertainment and storage.
  • Slideouts in some models, which move the RV wall outward up to three feet at the touch of a button to create larger living areas.

Folding Camping Trailer

Also known as pop-ups and tent trailers, Folding Camping Trailers are great for outdoor lovers who enjoy sleeping in a tent without sleeping on the ground. The Folding Camping Trailer stows away for easy, lightweight towing. With canvas sides that extend to reveal queen-sized beds, it’s easy to have a fresh-air experience with all the comforts of an RV.

Features

  • Folding Camping Trailers appeal to budget-conscious consumers looking for a roomy towable RV.
  • The lighter weight allows for towing behind many typical family vehicles, including some small cars. It is important to match the loaded weight of the RV to the towing capacity of the tow vehicle. Always check your vehicle’s owner’s manual for towing weight restrictions and have your tow package professionally installed.
  • Lightweight and easy to maneuver when closed, Folding Camping Trailers are a snap to unhitch from the tow vehicle, freeing the vehicle for errands and sightseeing.
  • The compact size allows for easy storage as well as quick and simple setup.
  • Ample living space means kitchen, dining and sleeping areas are standard, with additional amenities available depending on size.
  • Some Folding Camping Trailer models have slideouts that provide additional living space at the campground.

MOTORIZED RVS

Motorized RVs are vehicles designed as temporary living quarters for recreational camping, travel or seasonal use that are built on a motorized chassis.

Type A Motorhome

Type A or conventional motorhomes are constructed entirely on a specially designed motor vehicle chassis. Home-like amenities abound, and generally these motorhomes have kitchens, bathrooms, living areas with entertainment centers and centrally controlled heating and air conditioning.

Features

  • Spacious and well-equipped, even the smaller, basic models are roomy and home-like.
  • The larger, more luxurious models have many of the bells and whistles of a custom home.
  • Designed with extensive storage capacity and often include basement storage areas.
  • At a touch of a button, slideouts in some models move the RV wall outward up to three feet to create larger living areas. Many motorhome models include multiple slideouts.
  • Many owners choose to tow a small vehicle for short side trips once the motorhome is parked.

*Any experienced driver can take the wheel. In several states, additional non-commercial driver’s licensing may be required for motorhomes that utilize air brakes or exceed certain weight thresholds. Check with your local department of motor vehicles for specifics.

Type B Motorhome

Commonly called van campers, Type B Motorhomes are built using automotive manufactured van or panel-truck shells. Van campers drive more like the family car, but offer the comforts and conveniences of home on the road.

Features

  • Nimble and easy to drive, Type B Motorhomes are easy to park and maneuver, even in downtown settings.
  • Home-like conveniences are standard, including bathroom, sleeping, dining and kitchen facilities as well as storage.
  • Full stand-up room is achieved by raising the roof and sometimes by the use of dropped floors, for extra interior headroom.

Type C Motorhome

Type C Motorhomes are built on an automotive van frame with a wider body section attached to the original cab section. Many Type C Motorhomes are easily recognizable by the over-the-cab area that is often an optional sleeping area. Amenities are similar to those in conventional motorhomes.

Features

  • Ample living space includes sleeping, kitchen, dining and bathroom facilities, as well as entertainment systems and storage.
  • Slideouts in some models move the RV wall outward up to three feet at the touch of a button to create larger living areas.
  • Owners can tow a small vehicle for short side trips once the motorhome is parked.
  • The ability to easily move from the driving area or belted passenger seats to the living space when stopped along the way is the main reason owners say they chose a motorhome over a towable model.

SPECIALTY RVS

Specialty RVs are designed with very specific needs or amenities in mind. Various specialty RVs can be either motorized or towable.

Horse Trailers

Horse Trailers make traveling to equestrian events convenient, comforting and economical. Whether it’s an afternoon ride with one horse or a professional competition with several, an RV Horse Trailer will change the way you travel together.

Features

  • Travel with the comforts of home, which saves money by cooking your own meals and sleeping in your own bed instead of staying in a hotel.
  • Each RV Horse Trailer includes human conveniences such as kitchen, bathroom, bedroom and entertainment area, as well as secure stalls for each horse.
  • Enjoy the peace of mind knowing that your horses are under your care and your watchful eye at all times.
  • Generous storage means there’s plenty of space for feed and tack items as well as your gear, making preparation for competition seemingly effortless.

Ice Fish Houses

If the winter’s subfreezing temperatures make you dream of dropping a line in the ice, there’s no need to spend all your time in the elements. Fish Houses are a great way to stay sheltered from the cold and spend time with friends while you wait on your tip-ups.

Features

  • Lightweight for easy maneuvering, Fish Houses can be towed onto the ice with an ATV.
  • While some are very modest shelters providing bench seating and shelter from the elements, some Fish Houses come complete with heat, kitchens, bathrooms, beds and even satellite TV, making long days on the ice more pleasant and providing refuge for overnight stays near the lake. After a successful day on the ice, cook up the catch of the day on the stove while relaxing with friends.

RVs for the Disabled

Travel and outdoor enthusiasts with special physical needs are recapturing their mobility and enjoying time on the road in recreation vehicles. RVs are the ideal way for everyone to experience the open road in convenience, comfort and style. No worries at the end of the day about hotels that might not be able to meet individual needs. With everything you need in its place and at your fingertips, travel in your own familiar surroundings when you hit the road in an RV.

Features

A number of RV manufacturers offer factory modifications before delivery.

Besides standard RV home-like conveniences and amenities, accessible RV modifications can include:

  • Wheelchair lifts or ramps for access
  • Widened entrances and interior pathways
  • Lower kitchen counters and cabinets
  • Conveniently located controls
  • Roll-in showers
  • Roll-under sinks

PARK MODEL RVS

Park Model RVs are movable resort units designed exclusively for part-time recreational use.

Park Model RVs are unique units that provide temporary accommodations for recreation, camping or seasonal use. Park Model RVs are designed to look like a home, but they need to be hooked up to site electricity, sewer and water like any RV.

Features

  • Park Model RVs are a great match for those who want to experience Seasonal Campingand enjoy staying in one campground/resort for an extended period of time.
  • Seasonal Campingis when a campsite is rented for the full season, and the occupants treat it as if it were a vacation home that they can come and go to as frequently as they wish.
  • Park Model RVs give Seasonal Campers extra space to spread out. Many Park Model RVs have a sleeping loft on a second level.
  • While Park Model RVs are towable, with their large size, owners leave them at a resort to enjoy the Seasonal Campingexperience, but are able to move them when they want a change of scenery.

 

December 1, 2017 / by / in
Revisit History at the RV Hall of Fame

The history of RV travel is on display at the Recreational Vehicle/Manufactured Home Hall of Fame, located a short drive away in Elkhart, Indiana. This 100,000 square foot museum educates and entertains visitors with historical RVs and artifacts from all the top names in the industry.

RVs dating back 100 years are on display, including a 1913 Earl Travel Trailer – the oldest known to still exist. You’ll see everything from the oldest Winnebago to the smallest Airstream ever built. Follow a timeline of key events in RV development, such as the introduction of the first microwave oven and indoor toilet.

The RV Founders Hall is set up like a real RV park, complete with driveways and trees. Take a trip back in time among the trailers, photos, and memorabilia that show technological advancements from pre-World War I to the present. A tour highlight is the 1931 Chevrolet Housecar that was given to Mae West by Paramount Studios.

Learn about the 347 industry leaders and pioneers who have been inducted into the Hall of Fame since the RV/MH Heritage Foundation was formed in 1972. Also visit the RV/MH Library, which houses thousands of volumes of historical records, photos, and periodicals dedicated entirely to archiving the history of recreational vehicles and manufactured homes. For more information about the museum and facilities, visit www.rvmhhalloffame.org.

December 1, 2017 / by / in
A Seasonal Site Can be Just What You Need

So you’re thinking about joining the pool of seasonal campers. If you’re still part of the working world, seasonal camping can be a great way to quickly get away to unwind for several weekends throughout the summer. And for retirees, it can be your season-long home after spending winters in a warmer southern climate.

But before taking the leap, here are some things you may want to consider before making your decision.

Figure out what type of campground is best for you. Are you looking for a family oriented park that caters to young parents with kids, or would you prefer quieter park geared more toward retirees?

What amenities are important to you? Perhaps you’d like a golf course or fishing lake just down the road. Maybe you want a swimming pool or restaurant on-site. Are there attractions nearby? Do the planned activities fit your interests?

How far do want to drive? Set a maximum distance from home that you’re comfortable driving several times during the camping season. You’ll likely want someplace close, but far enough to feel like you’re getting away.

Ask about site amenities such as electric and sewer. Do they allow you to build decks, set up a storage shed, or use golf carts? Read the campground rules, especially their policy on pets if you plan to bring your dog.

Compare seasonal rates and what services they may include. Walk around the campground. Talk to other seasonal campers and find out what they like or dislike about the park. Get a feel for the cleanliness and maintenance of the facilities.

Above all – take your time in making a decision by doing your homework and keeping an open mind. By doing so, you can be sure to find a campground that is just right for you.

 

December 1, 2017 / by / in
Getting Started in Camping

Getting Started in Camping Are you a NEWBIE to camping? Or maybe you went camping as a kid, and are interested in getting back into it. There is no better time than the present to enjoy the world of camping – especially if you have young children. Studies show that half of all current campers experienced their first camping trip before they reached the age of seven. Introducing kids to camping at a younger age is vital to their enjoyment of the activity throughout life.

Why take up camping? If you have young children, they’ll be motivated to try it simply because it’s fun in the outdoors. Whether or not you’ve started a family, many young adults find camping is a great way to manage stress. Exercise is another motivator; as over 80% of campers do so in combination with other outdoor activities, such as hiking, fishing, boating, or bicycling.

Other than the fact that camping is an enjoyable family-oriented outdoor activity, another big reason it’s so popular is because it’s an affordable vacation. One can get started in camping with a minimal investment.

Tent camping is the most common form for newbies and veterans alike. Tents come in all shapes and sizes, and bargains can be easily found whether you’re looking for a 2-person pop-up, or a multiple room tent for a large group or family. For milder climates, there’s no need to purchase expensive sleeping bags when basic models will work just find. Or just bring sheets and comforters from home. A good air mattress or cot will go a long way for your sleeping comfort.

Equipment wise, most camping trips don’t require anything fancy. Collapsible chairs are nice, or you can even sit on a sturdy cooler – a necessity for keeping food and beverages cold. Gas camp stoves are pretty affordable, but certainly not mandatory. Build a fire with charcoal or wood in your site’s fire ring, and cook hotdogs and s’mores over the hot coals. A cast iron skillet, a pot to boil water for coffee, and a few kitchen utensils can probably get you by.

Most other things needed for a beginner’s camping trip you likely already own – flashlights, pillows, towels and wash clothes, dishes, games, etc. And anything you don’t have can be easily acquired at a reasonable price if you plan ahead. Watch for sale ads in the newspaper, peruse garage sales, and even auctions are a great source for picking up camping equipment for next to nothing.

Spending the weekend at a nearby campground is a great introduction to camping. Soon you’ll be traveling across the state for weeklong camping trips. Before you know it, you’ll be retired and spending entire summers on a seasonal site.

So jump on the camping bandwagon today, and you’ll quickly see why 40 million Americans already enjoy the most popular form of outdoor recreation.

 

December 1, 2017 / by / in
Cabin Rentals Rising in Popularity

In response to customer demand, more and more campgrounds are adding cabins to their overnight accommodations. Campground cabin rentals can best be described as something between tent camping and staying at a hotel.

However there is one huge benefit to vacationers who choose a campground cabin as opposed to a private cabin or hotel room. Staying at a campground allows them access to all the exciting amenities the campground has to offer – from swimming pools and fishing ponds, to game rooms, planned activities, and more!

Best of all, you’ll find cabins come in all shapes and sizes to fit any budget and comfort level. For smaller parties who still desire a rustic experience, there are simple camping cabins with bunks and a small amount of living space. They’re as close to tent camping as one can get, without having to bring a tent.

Other cabins offer a step up, with a bedroom or two for small families. Some will offer bathrooms, a small living area, and maybe a grill and dining table. More deluxe cabins may have their own small kitchen, television, air-conditioning, and heat.

Looking for a more luxurious experience? You’ll find cabins built to accommodate multiple families or large groups of friends. They might have multiple bedrooms and baths, a full kitchen, indoor fireplace, and maybe a deck with a hot tub.

There’s another great benefit to campground cabins. It allows novices to camping the chance to sample the campground lifestyle, without having to invest in lots of equipment.

So do some research. Find out what type of cabins and amenities are available at your favorite campground, and make a reservation today. But book early! With their rise in popularity, cabin rentals are going quickly.

 

December 1, 2017 / by / in